Tag Archives: Lifetime Finances

Estimating Savings Required for Retirement

A general rule is that you should be saving 10% of your salary for retirement. Because everyone’s situation is different, how do you know if this is too much or not enough. How does your pension, CPP and OAS affect this number? The spreadsheet combines two of the most popular posts to help answer this question. More

Comparing an Annuity to a RRIF or a LIF

If you have a defined contribution pension, when you retire you must convert it into either an annuity or a Life Income Fund. If you have an RRSP you must convert it to an annuity or a RRIF. What is best for you? This post and spreadsheet will help you evaluate your options. More

Introducing Lifetime Finances Lite

If you do not need the full capabilities of FinanceBase-Lifetime Finances or do not want to pay the full price, try this Lite version at a reduced price. It performs all of the calculations needed to use your assets, income & expenses during your lifetime to project whether you will outlive your money. It can be used at any age and provides a yearly cash flow (income less expenses, including taxes) from now to 45 years after retirement. Data can only be entered on the Entry page and changes cannot be made in any year on the other pages. More

FinanceBase-Lifetime Finances, More Than a Retirement Calculator

If you want more than the simple retirement calculators that you can find online, explore the lifetime finances planner discussed in this post. It is feature-rich but is easy to use that uses your expenses, income and assets to provide a cash flow and asset movement from now until up to 45 years past retirement. Charts make it easy to see if you have shortfalls in any years and if your assets will last during your lifetime. You can make changes in any year and try various “what-ifs” to see the impact. More

Estimating How Much You Need In Retirement

How much do you really need to retire? Are you one of the majority that either have a large number in mind or do not know? It may not be as bad as you think. What you need is an estimate of your expenses when you retire based on what you spend today, have an understanding of where your retirement income will come from and how you will use your savings. A spreadsheet is provided that will help you and it only takes a few minutes to fill in. You can try different values for capital, interest rates, inflation rate and withdrawal amounts. More

Nortel Pension Settlement – Deferred Pension

About one-quarter of the 13,000 Nortel pensioners that are members of the Nortel Managerial and Non-Negotiated Pension Plan (Reg. 0342048) must take a Deferred Pension in the form of a Locked-In Retirement Account (LIRA). Before age 71 the LIRA must be converted to an annuity or to a Life Income Fund (LIF). The references, comments and spreadsheet provided in this post may be of some assistance in making the choice. It is also of use for others who need to compare an annuity against a LIF when converting the LIRA. More

Nortel Pension Settlement Options – Annuity vs LIF

There are some 13,000 Nortel pensioners that are members of the Nortel Managerial and Non-Negotiated Pension Plan (Reg. 0342048). The settlement of this plan provides members in some provinces with the option of either receiving the default of an annuity or taking the commuted value and converting it into a Life Income Fund (LIF). The references, comments and spreadsheet provided in this post may be of some assistance in making the choice. It is also of use for others who need to compare an annuity against a LIF. More

Estimating Capital Totals at Retirement

Estimating Capital Totals at RetirementChart4If you have been putting money into an RRSP, TFSA or other investments over the years, have you ever projected how much you will have when you retire? If you are just starting, what will you have if you save some money each year? This is important because it will determine what is available for a yearly income when you retire. The spreadsheet provided lets you try out different options. The results may surprise you as even a small amount of savings each year combined with compounding can really add up. More

Survey Shows Canadians Are Not Prepared For Retirement

Survey Shows Canadians Are Not Prepared For Retirement1The 2015 Canadian Payroll Association once again shows that about three-quarters of Canadians are far behind their retirement goals, are not saving towards retirement and expect to need a lot of savings. The survey had a lot of exposure on September 9, 2015. However, most of it just summarizes the press releases. If you want more details, read on. More

Setting TFSA and RRIF Withdrawals

Setting TFSA and RRIF Withdrawals 3When you retire, or if you are already retired, and you have TFSA and RRSP/RRIF, you will want to set your withdrawals to match your income needs. You should also manage how your capital is being depleted. The spreadsheet provided offers options for doing both. More

Calculating TFSA and RRSP Totals at Retirement

Calculating TFSA and RRSP Totals at Retirement 3If you have been putting money into an RRSP and/or TFSA over the years, have you ever projected how much you will have when you retire? If you are just starting, what will you have if you save some money each year? This is important because it will determine what is available for a yearly income when you retire. The spreadsheet provided lets you try out different options. The results may surprise you as even a small amount of savings each year combined with compounding can really add up. More

Understanding Your Canadian Sources Of Retirement Income

Understanding Your Canadian Sources Of Retirement Income Chart1When you are retired you will probably have more sources of income than you had when you were working. There will be OAS, GIS, CPP, RRIF, TFSA, Annuity, company pension and investments. You may have all or some of them depending your income and time in Canada during your working life. This post will help you understand how these are obtained and their impact on retirement income and taxes. More

Determining Yearly Rates for Stock Prices and Dividends

There is a lot of information available to help you evaluate a stock you might be considering. The long-term yearly rate by which the stock price and dividends has increased (or decreased) is an important statistic that is not easy to find, without paying for the analysis. An Excel spreadsheet can be downloaded that you can use to generate this information. The resulting yearly rate for both the stock and dividends can be used in FinanceBase-Lifetime Finances to help project the long-term cash flow. More

Lifetime Finances Calculations

FinanceBase-Lifetime Finances takes the data you enter and performs a number of calculations each time a value is changed to produce the tables, charts and analysis that are displayed on the windows and pages. More

Comments From Developing Lifetime Finances and FinanceBase

While developing Lifetime Finances and FinanceBase, I also developed a viewpoint on number of items that may be of interest. In particular, there is a lack of good, non-product retirement planning, finances in Canada and the USA are surprisingly similar, compounding has good and bad effects, “rule of thumb” is not a good way to plan for retirement and software should be easy to use, but also permit access to special features. More